Wednesday

Four Myths About Reimagining Your Life


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Most of us want to believe that we can reimagine our life's second chapter and purpose, but allow negative and inaccurate thinking to stop us from doing just that. Here is author Richard Leider's list of four common myths that stop us from seeking out our next purpose:

Myth #1: To now have a new possibility means I must do something completely original.

Can you really recall anything that is totally new? Almost every idea or creation is an extension or synthesis of previous efforts. New breakthroughs are built on existing fundamental truths. Like runners in a relay race, we simply do our part to carry the baton another leg of the race.

 

Myth #2: Only a few gifted or skilled people are able to discover new paths and possibilities in their lives.

This is the most commonly rationalized of all myths. History, however, is filled with great contributions made by ordinary people who had virtually no experience or expertise in the areas where they thrived in their lives' second chapter. In fact, being a "seasoned novice" gives us permission and courage to step into things with fresh passion and purpose.


Myth #3: What I want to do next will come as inspiration or revelation. Until that time comes, I will wait.

Inspiration comes to those who seek it. We don't find beautiful shells unless we're on the beach. If we believe in the the "miracle moment" theory, we rarely will find it. If we wait for "a sign," we end up being waiters for the rest of our lives.


Myth #4: It's too late; I'm too old. This something you do when you're younger.


Realizing new possibilities is a cradle-to-grave quest. Situations and people change every day and continue to change throughout our life. As long as there is change, there are new opportunities. Keep in mind that you now also have two things you had less of before: time and experience. Use them.


4 comments:

Calimyrna Moon said...

'Purpose' is such a big word, almost frightening in its implications. I say start small. Today I will think good thoughts about all situations and all people. I will offer kindness in some form to everyone with whom I come in contact - even if that can only be in the form of a silent prayer. I will feel gratitude. For today, that is purpose enough.

Barbara Winter said...

I'm doing a quick e-mail check before heading to Sedona to conduct a seminar called Inspired Livelihood. My trip is going to be slightly delayed while I print this out to share with the group. Brilliant. Utterly brilliant.

And, of course, your timing couldn't have been better.

BK said...

Barbara, thank you for your kind words. If you could spread the word about our newsletter as well, we'd greatly appreciate it!

will said...

I am often asked this question when counselling.
It is funny how it worries some and not others.
Thanks